Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Vocabulary Challenge

Each day of the year, you will see a new Vocabulary Challenge. This is a set of five words, chosen at random from the Latin High Frequency list. The challenge is for you to compose a sentence, or several related sentences, using each of those five words at least once. You can also get a random Vocabulary Challenge, if you don't like the one listed for a particular day (just reload the page to get a new group of words at random). The words are all link to the online Glossa dictionary, which reproduces the text of the Lewis & Short dictionary, with macrons.

Very rarely, randomness will make the same word appear twice in the group of five. When that happens, take it as a challenge to find a related word - so, if aurum shows up twice in the list, maybe you can use both aurum and a related word like aureus or auratus in your sentence(s).


Vocabulary Challenge for Today:

Random Vocabulary Challenge:

Here is the challenge:

Can you manage to fit all five words into a single sentence? If so, that's great!

Alternatively, you might want to use several sentences. See if you can turn those sentences into a little story.

If you come up with a sentence or sentence(s) that you are proud of and would like to share with others, post them as a comment here at the blog. Make sure you list the five words at the beginning of the sentence(s) so that people can see what you were working with. Here's an example:

fera - saepe - summus - satis - scio: Ferae enim homines non sunt, sed satis sciunt, et saepe summa!

ante - ostium - de - autem - antequam: Antequam ostium aperio, scire volo aliquid de homine qui ante ostium stat; ille autem nihil loquitur.

Here are some more examples - I'll be tagging the posts at this blog as "challenge" when I decided to give it a try!


3 comments:

AEM said...

Today's random challenge was credo, se, dico, tunc, cunctus. My sentence:

Tunc, cuncta ille credit quae sibi dicit, etiamsi falsissima.

Laura Gibbs said...

EUGE!!!

The phrase "etiamsi falsissima" is lovely! That's something so easy and so expressive in Latin, and not easy to render in English.

It reminds me of this great word puzzle attributed sometimes to Saint Bernard -you can see it here; it's a set of words for generating wise advice, and one of the sentences you can generate is the following:
Noli credere omnia quae audis, quia qui credit omnia quae audit saepe credit quod non est. :-)

Andrea Weis said...

fantastic. Okay, I'm going off to compose now.